Need Aid Filing Personal Bankruptcy? Attempt These Concepts!

Looking into bankruptcy can be like looking into a murky sea. With so many laws and regulations, how do you know what steps to take so you can file for bankruptcy and get on with your life? Luckily, this article can provide you with some valuable tips on how to proceed. Read on!

Trying to exclude family members you owe money to before filing for personal bankruptcy can get you into serious hot water. The court will look into who you pay-off as far as a year back, and if they find you showing favor to family over other creditors, they could invalidate your filing completely.



After your bankruptcy has been discharged, or finalized, a good way to begin re-building your credit is to obtain a pre-paid credit card. This type of card is usually available at your local bank. The card is secured by the amount of money you load onto it. You can not charge more than what you have loaded onto the card, so over-spending shouldn't be a problem. It works like a regular credit card, with monthly statements and payments. After you have kept this card in good standing for a period of time, you may be able to have it switched into a regular, revolving credit card.

Any bankruptcy consultation should be free of charge. When you arrive at a consultation ask plenty of questions. You should also seek free consultations from several attorneys prior to choosing one. Choose an attorney who is experienced, educated and well-versed in bankruptcy laws. After the consultation, you are not immediately required to come up with a decision. So you have sufficient time to speak with a number of lawyers.

If you have filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, but realize that you are unable to meet your payment obligations, you may be able to convert to a Chapter 7 bankruptcy instead. To qualify for the conversion, you must never have converted your bankruptcy before and also undergo a financial evaluation. The laws surrounding this process are always changing, so be sure to talk with an attorney who can help you navigate this process.

Do not feel embarrassed or guilty about filling for bankruptcy. Many people fear that they will be treated as second class citizens after they declare themselves bankrupt. However, this is not the case. have a peek here to 'declare yourself bankrupt' was developed by the government to enable assistance to be given to people who find themselves overwhelmed with debt and in need of a fresh start. Last year, over 1.4 million people filed bankruptcy and the majority of them are now living a happy, debt-free life. So, there is no need for you to be afraid of bankruptcy stigma.

Evaluate your consultation with any lawyer by the way he or she handled the consult. Consider the length of your consult. If it lasted less than 15 minutes or it was with an assistant rather than an actual lawyer conducting the consult, this could signal that lawyer is probably not the best choice. You want someone that takes the time to handle your case personally, and you want to get your money's worth. You should also shy away from those lawyers who pressure you with phone calls or try convincing you immediately after a consultation by getting pushy.

Make sure that you fully understand the implications of declaring yourself bankrupt. Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you will find it difficult to secure any credit at all. While you may not see that consequence as a huge problem at the moment, if you wish to purchase a home in the future, or lease an automobile, you are probably going to need the credit.

Be highly skeptical of any debt settlement companies. If possible, avoid using one altogether. Often times, because you are paying them monthly, they will drag their feet on your filing to make more money. They are usually unregulated, as well, which makes it difficult to fight any injustices you may encounter.

Knowing that you are required to disclose anything that you have sold, given away or transferred in the two years prior to filing can help you avoid a costly mistake. Full disclosure is required. Not disclosing everything can land you in jail or a discharge of your personal bankruptcy petition.

When you are about to file for bankruptcy, be sure you have all the financial information at hand. Even things that you do not use, should be listed in a bankruptcy filing. These could include, income from even small jobs, any vehicles listed in the filer's name whether or not they use them, and any pending lawsuits.

When you file bankruptcy, you want to avoid finding yourself in similar dire financial circumstances, so planning for and making a post-bankruptcy budget is a good idea. When you can create such a budget and stick to it after bankruptcy, you are far less likely to find yourself in the same position in the future, ensuring you are more financially free.

Prior to filing for personal bankruptcy, take care to not make withdrawals from your retirement accounts, IRA's, or 401k's. You may think you are doing the right thing to free up money, but often these types of accounts are protected from any bankruptcy proceedings. If you withdrawal the money, you may be opening it up to any bankruptcy action.

Do not "�play the system' before filing bankruptcy. Do not go out and run up all of your credit cards, this does not look good to the judge working on your case, and it will not look good on your record. Once you decide to file, quit using your credit cards immediately.


Do not take filing for bankruptcy lightly. Remember, your bankruptcy will appear on your credit report for ten years after you file, and you are unable to file again for six years. You may have a difficult time securing credit or low interest rates in the future, so make sure that you save this option until you truly have no alternatives.

If you are avoiding personal bankruptcy but fear that you will lose your retirement savings, you should know that is not likely to happen. If you have an ERISA qualified retirement program (most are), then your retirement savings are safe from claims by creditors. This applies to funds in 401ks and to most IRAs. Consult your own bankruptcy attorney for specific details for your circumstances, but you should know the odds are in your favor.

Continue to pay certain bills. Once you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you won't receive any more collection calls, and you may cease to receive certain bills. Remember that official source are still under obligation to pay for your 'secured possessions', such as your home or vehicle, or you may lose them.

Take note of any tip you found to be especially helpful here. Print a copy to keep on your desk as you prepare to file for personal bankruptcy. This will make it easy to benefit the most from the information learned here. It is the details that are missed that may hurt you the most, so be sure to be careful when filing.

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